MSI’s List of Recommended CFD and Fluid Mechanics Books

 

In the following a partial list of my favorite books on your way to mastery of CFD:

    • Doug McLean’s presentation “Common Misconceptions in Aerodynamics” is actually a preview for a seminal and intuitive book “Understanding Aerodynamic” I especially recommend:

    • some more amazing CFD material is posted on behalf of J.M. McDonough (university of Kentucky).
      The fascinating lecture notes shall take the reader on the road from basic fluid dynamics to numerical modeling and CFD related numerical handling in general and CFD related issues, through a remarkable lecture on the witchcraft of Turbulence Modelling  (one of the most enlightening lecture notes I’ve read (quite a few times 🙂 ) and to confronting Computational Analysis of Partial differential Equations (ever more so for the calculation of Multiphysics problems) all of which from a mathematician point of view, hence with a lot of scrutiny.

      The lectures are one of the most thorough and well written I was honored to have had a chance to tackle.
      Lectures in Elementary Fluid Dynamics

       

      Lectures in Computational Numerical Analysis

      Lectures on Turbulence and Turbulence Modeling – highly

      recommended

      (Lectures on Computational Analysis of Incompressible Flow (all the need to know concerning NS basic numerical modelling)

      Lectures on Computational Analysis of PDEs

       

    • This book is primarily intended as a graduate-level text in turbulent flows for engineering … STEPHEN B. POPE one of CFD giants:

      Turbulent flows – Department of Aerospace Engineering

       

    • Large Eddy simulation of Incompressible flow (see overview):
    • David Wilcox book of turbulence modelling should be on each CFD practitioner book shelf:
    • J.D. Anderson is a building block for CFD modelling:
    • “Stability and Transition of Shear Flows” by Dan Hennigson (et. al.) is one of the best books to get in-depth acquainted with one of the obscure topics of fluid mechanics. I have read many of the chapters quite a few times and it led me through my thesis:

       

       

    • OpenFoam – Tobias Holzmann – Holzmann CFD holds as many tutorials as one like to open up to the world of OpenFoam including a downloadable book.
      Writing an OpenFoam book including the theoretical background is a rare gift to the open source community (one of my 5-C zone keys).
    • Computational Acoustics  – the book presents a state-of-art overview of numerical schemes efficiently solving the acoustic conservation equations (unknowns are acoustic pressure and particle velocity) and the acoustic wave equation (pressure of acoustic potential formulation)- 

       

       

    • Large Eddy Simulation by M. Lesieur, O. Metais and Pierre Comte is a special book on LES. Introducing the concept of “structure Function” in a very in-depth manner. One of the books I enjoyed every page

       

       

    • This one is a complementary to that presented in note 4 albeit the core subject is very different. Pierre Sagaut books are always a thrill of knowledge.



    • Another very elaborate Pierre Sagaut, this one on the role (and future role) of LES in Aeroacoustics. The book is very self explanatory, filled with examples and very enjoyable to read:
      pdf version:Large-Eddy Simulation for Acoustics – ResearchGate

       

      Hard cover:

       

    • This one is one of the best for novice CFD practitioners who have the passion to reach a higher level of practice:

       

       

    • This next as stated in its name is a true voyage through turbulence, written by some of my favorite scientists, a worthwhile book:

       

       

    • This book is a seminal work and a “must read” for those who own true passion for turbulence. it’s a book written by LES modeling researchers I especially admire, some very important concepts in fluid mechanics vorticity based analysis are presented:

       

       

    • Turbulence: The Legacy of A. N. Kolmogorov.
      Surely some of the seminal works in the universality of turbulence came from the hand of a brilliant mathematician and sadly, in the cold war era.
      Andrey Kolmogorov’s contribution stands in the front of turbulence and even CFD understanding.
      Written by Uriel Frisch, who has taken Kolmogorov’s qualitative universal laws a step forward in understanding
    • Learn the basic of how to approach fluid dynamics problems. CFD is included but most importantly the ground basics of fluid dynamics for bot under graduates and graduates.

    • SLearn OperFOAM like the best The OpenFOAM Technology Primer

This is just a short list to begin with. I shall add as we go on… 😉


 


25 thoughts on “MSI’s List of Recommended CFD and Fluid Mechanics Books

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  21. Hye. I just register for Msc. and graduated in mechanical engineering. I love CFD and my goal to become CFD engineer. While my Msc. core topic is HVAC but still need CFD for simulation. What sad me is, I still don’t understand CFD. Do you have suggestion for book, ebook, course or anything for me to start with?

    Like

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